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HOW FRAGRANCE AFFECTS SLEEP

HOW FRAGRANCE AFFECTS SLEEP

It goes without saying that anything that interrupts or deters you from getting the sleep you and your family needs should be eliminated. And while I could do a whole series on the different sleep deterrents (hello social media), I wanted to bring up this particular topic because it is one that affects the family as a whole and that is often overlooked.    Our sense of smell has a direct connection to the brain as there is little barrier between the brain and the chemicals you breathe in. Many of the fragrances in your favorite household items are made by chemicals that cause the brain to become more active and therefore affect your ability to get a good night’s rest. Same goes for your child.   Think for a second about all of the products in your home that have a perfumey smell: laundry detergent, bath gels, spray cans of air freshener, plug-in air fresheners, fabric softener, dishwashing liquid, baby lotion, shampoo, deodorant…the list goes on and on.   While they might smell good, the fragrance used in many cosmetics and the household products are made of more than 3,000 chemicals, with any one product having hundreds at a time.  

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HOW EVERYDAY CLEANERS AFFECT YOUR HEALTH

HOW EVERYDAY CLEANERS AFFECT YOUR HEALTH

When it comes to cleaning your home, I’d bet you have a certain smell you love that signals that your home is spotless. Lemon-scented cleaners are among the most popular, as well as other citrus fragrances. But have you ever considered what happens inside your family’s body when you use these products? The effects are likely greater than you realize. NO TIME TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE? CLICK HERE FOR THIS ARTICLE IN A PINCH.   The Science of Smell Smelling something begins when an odor (in the form of gas molecules) enters your nose. From there, it is on a straight path to your brain for interpretation. Your brain quickly processes the smell for safety before you interact with it further. The smell will then be deemed as pleasant or unpleasant, dangerous or safe with things that are sweet-smelling typically perceived as pleasant and safe while bitter or harsh smells are perceived as dangerous. Your sense of smell is very closely associated with the part of your brain that stores memory and emotions. This direct link is the reason certain smells can bring on instant floods of memories. The smell of nutmeg, for example, immediately reminds me of Thanksgiving

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